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Welcome

Minnesota Herb Society is an organization of herb enthusiasts who come together to encourage the study, the growing, and the use of herbs.

As volunteers, we plant and maintain the designated herb gardens at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum.

Meetings are the 4th Tuesdays of January, March, May, August and October. Contact us to learn more.

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Minnesota Herb Society

Nonprofit Organization
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The MN Herb Society is an organization committed to encourage the study, growing and use of herbs.

Minnesota Herb Society

2 days 16 hours ago

Happy Valentines Day Herbies! ❤️💕😍🥰

Here is an interesting gender fact to ponder. During the year, women purchase 75% of the chocolate, but during the days before Valentine’s Day, 75% of the chocolate purchases are made by men. Consider this, too: we’re not the first civilization to value chocolate—and of course, chocolate is an herb, too! ❤️🥰

Minnesota Herb Society

1 week 1 day ago

Is the Corinvirus scare making you nervous? ... influenza?

After visiting the hospital for the past 6 weeks while my husband was ill I can vouch for the claims in this article. Use preventative care and take care of yourself before, during and after.

Minnesota Herb Society

1 week 2 days ago

Happy Birthday Laura Ingalls Wilder

A Garden of Used-to-Be

Laura Ingalls was born in Pepin, Wisconsin on February 7, 1867. She spent her girlhood moving with her family to Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, and Dakota Territory, where they finally settled.

Like many other pioneer women, Laura’s mother, Caroline Ingalls, had the task of making a home wherever the family lived. Pioneer women always took seeds and “starts” (plant divisions) from one home to another, for they could not expect to find what they needed where they settled. Gardens were vital to survival, producing not only vegetables for the table but the medicinal herbs that women used to treat the family’s common ailments and sweeten their lives with fragrance and flavor.

A pioneer garden—a “Garden of Used-to-Be,” as Laura once called it—can be an interesting theme garden. If you’d like to include a pioneer corner in your herb garden, consider these plants:

Medicinal herbs: thyme, lavender, yarrow, horehound, feverfew, echinacea, peppermint, wormwood, mullein, clover, Queen Anne’s lace
Tea herbs: mint, beebalm, lemon balm, catnip, red clover
Culinary herbs: sage, thyme, dill, horseradish, mustard, rosemary
Housekeeping herbs: mint (pesticide), lavender and rosemary (disinfectant), southernwood and tansy (to repel fleas, moths)
Here’s an easy herb project that Caroline Ingalls might have asked her daughters to make to freshen drawers and trunks and as simple gifts for friends and neighbors.

Drawer Freshener and Moth Repellent

Blend together some or all of the following dried herbs, in equal amounts: wormwood, tansy, lavender, thyme, rosemary, mint. Cut six-inch squares of loose-weave fabric. Lay wrong-side up and place 2-3 tablespoons of dried herbs in the center. Gather up the edges and tie securely with a pretty ribbon.

Minnesota Herb Society

Minnesota Herb Society

1 month 1 week ago

Minnesota Herb Society updated their profile picture.

Minnesota Herb Society

Minnesota Herb Society

1 month 1 week ago

Welcome to January - official Hot Tea Month!

Cold weather can not escape us during winter. Bitter cold can come when we are thinking of flying south. But for a lot of us that is not an option. Here are some happy healthy ways to make choices when buying, making and sipping hot tea!
Zero waste and healthy!

Minnesota Herb Society

1 month 2 weeks ago

Minnesota Herb Society updated their profile picture.

Minnesota Herb Society

Minnesota Herb Society

1 month 2 weeks ago

Minnesota Herb Society updated their profile picture.

Minnesota Herb Society

Minnesota Herb Society

1 month 2 weeks ago

Minnesota Herb Society updated their profile picture.

Minnesota Herb Society

Minnesota Herb Society

1 month 3 weeks ago

Minnesota Herb Society

Minnesota Herb Society

2 months 20 hours ago

Today, December 17, is National Maple Syrup Day!

Up until the 1930s, the United States led in maple syrup production, now Canada is the world’s largest maple syrup producer.

Maple syrup was first collected, processed and used by the indigenous peoples of North America. The practice was then adopted by the European settlers who gradually refined production methods.

A maple syrup production farm is called a sugarbush or a sugarwood.
Sap is boiled in a sugar house which is also known as a sugar shack, sugar shanty or a cabane à sucre.

A while back I vacationed in Quebec City. It was maple syrup heaven! Since then I have been using maple syrup in place of white, refined sugar in recipes. This is a baked fruit dish where I use maple syrup to sweeten. It is a recipe adapted from @wholefedhomestead.

Minnesota Herb Society